Friday, November 22, 2013

Chess Camp Curosities: Part 1

Well the really fun thing about amateur-level play is the amount of mistakes which we make that allows the game to swing wildly in either direction. While admittedly grandmasters do blunder once in a while (like how Anand just blundered in yesterday's match!), but definitely not as much as our level!

So now I'm gonna release the 3 games played during Activity 3 of our chess camp over here one by one. Here's the first one-- and see the mistakes that both sides make that really decide the game!


1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nf6
3. Nxe5 d6
4. Nf3 Nxe4
5. d4 d5
6. c4 c6
7. Nc3 Bb4
8. Qb3 Bxc3+
9. bxc3 (D)


9... dxc4?

After this move White will recapture with the bishop, thus gaining a huge lead in development. Black would have been better off by completing development with something like 9. O-O

10. Bxc4 O-O
11. O-O Nd6
12. Bd3 h6
13. Re1 b6
14. Ne5 Re8
15. Ba3 Be6
16. Qc2 f5?! (D)


Drops a pawn, but according to Darryl "Black gets compensation by exchanging his (bad) bishop for the opponent's active one". Fair enough o.o

17. Bxd6 Qxd6
18. Bxf5 Bxf5
19. Qxf5 Rf8
20. Qg4 Qf6
21. Re2 Na6
22. Nd7

Stronger was 22. Qd7, where Black is helpless against the invasion of the 7th rank. Now, Black can simply escape the knight fork with...

22... Qf5
23. Qxf5 Rxf5
24. Re7

Nevertheless, White is still winning over here.

24... c5
25. dxc5 Nxc5
26. Nxc5 Rxc5
27. Rc1 Ra5
28. Rc2 Rc8
29. f3 Ra3
30. Kf2 a5
31. Re3 b5
32. Ke2 b4 (D)


33. Kd2

33. c4! would have been better, giving White a passed pawn. Now, Black has amazingly solved most of his problems and played into an equal endgame, although he is still a pawn down.

33... bxc3+
34. Rexc3 Rcxc3
35. Rxc3 Rxa2+
36. Rc2 Rxc2+
37. Kxc2 (D)
0-1


The game continued for quite some time, but Black's outside passed pawn eventually proved decisive. How quickly the tides of war swing!

I'll post the next two games soon in future articles.

1 comment:

  1. Why did my team screw up so bad?! Even Qe4 on move 22 seems better, leaving black to solve a fork and losing a center pawn at the same time. Sigh...

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